Best Shock Absorbing & Impact Protection Running Shoes

The best shock absorbing running shoes utilize technologies, usually, within the midsole. Moreover, shock-absorbent midsoles help to treat each new step in its own unique way. With only part of the stored compression being released to create a ‘springy’ sensation, there are at least two separate available intakes of steps; light and rigid.

Last Updated: June 25, 2018
By Tony Skye:

The recent update reflects the best of 2018’s shock absorbing & impact protection running shoes of all types, shapes, sizes, colors, with new information as to how to choose the best shock absorbing & impact protection running shoes and our criteria for evaluation. Also, included are some of the most frequently asked questions about shock absorbing & impact protection running shoes.

Featured Recommendations

Salomon XR Mission
  • Salomon XR Mission
  • 4.5 out of 5
    Our rating
  • EVA Midsole
  • Sensiflex Technology
  • Price: See Here
ASICS Gel-Venture 6
  • ASICS Gel-Venture 6
  • 4.5 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Removable Sockliner
  • Rearfoot GEL Cushioning
Brooks Ghost 10
  • Brooks Ghost 10
  • 4.6 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Neutral Support
  • High-energizing Cushioning

A light step intake best describes when you are walking in conjunction with the midsole. With good shock-absorbing technology, the midsole intakes the step with easy-like compression. While you run, on the other hand, a stiffer compression needs to occur to handle the heavier, more rigid step. In essence, this plurality in design helps to achieve a balance between walking and running. As such, it is easier to perceive the best shock absorbing running shoes when making a purchase.

 

10 Best Shock Absorbing Running Shoes

 

 

1. Salomon XR Mission

Great for short and medium distance running, the Salomon XR Mission running shoes are built with an EVA midsole. The midsole provides cushioning when your heels strike the terrain while providing a lightweight characteristic. In addition, these shoes are built to be both on-road and off-road compatible. In conclusion, these shoes are wonderful when running short-to-medium distances.
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Eva Midsole
An EVA midsole is a popular choice in heel shock absorption, and these shoes have it. Comfortable impacts when your heel strikes the ground, these running shoes utilize a soft-cushioning system. Lastly, the foam footbed helps to reduce friction.

Sensifit and Sensiflex
Firstly, Sensifit technology is created to help promote a natural rolling motion. Cradling the upper-instep, the design helps to maintain a secure fit. Secondly, Sensiflex technology supports foot expansion during your run. Finally, the two together provide a comfortable experience during your workout.

Cost and Value
These running shoes are budget-friendly. Next, they deploy a well-rounded shock absorber system. As such, the high-quality design these runners implement make these shoes a great purchase choice for those looking for a pair of short-to-medium distance running shoes.
Pros
  • EVA Midsole
  • Sensifit Technology
  • Sensiflex Technology
  • Quicklace System
  • Breathable Mesh Upper
Cons
  • Short-to-medium recommended distance only
  • Only available in 3 colors

2. ASICS Gel-Venture 6

These shoes have gel shock absorbing technology to help provide a less impactful strike when your heel hits the ground. This allows for a smoother transition to your mid-stance. Secondly, these best shock absorbing running shoes are, also, equipped with a removable sockliner; for those in need of orthotic support. Finally, the outsole is designed for rugged terrain; thereby, traction will not be an issue for trail runners.
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GEL Cushioning System
Reducing force and impact is the goal of any shock absorbing technology. In this, the GEL cushioning system designed by ASICS does just that. Moreover, this system helps to smooth the transition from impact phase to mid-stance. In doing so, not only can you run in style, but you will be comfortable in the process.

Removable Sockliner
For those in need of a medical orthotic, you can have the benefits of owning an excellent pair of running shoes while achieving the support you need. These running shoes have a removable sockliner which allows you to easily place your medical orthotic inside.

Cost and Value
The price range jumps according to size. The attribute of having a removable sock-liner for orthotic support, however, makes the high-end of the range seem minute. Secondly, these shoes have a wonderful transition from impact to mid-stance. As such, this pair of running shoes is a great buy; especially, for those in need of orthotic support.
Pros
  • Removable Sockliner
  • Rearfoot Gel Cushioning
  • Multi-directional Lugs
  • Stitched-down Toe Bumper
Cons
  • Better for rugged terrain

3. Saucony Cohesion 10

3. Saucony Cohesion 10
These running shoes utilize EVA shock absorbing technology via injection molding. This means the midsole has a nice bounce feature associated with it. Furthermore, this pair of shoes brings comfort through the cushioning aspect of EVA. In addition, the upper is both flexible and breathable. Lastly, because these shoes deploy an ideal environment set for lessening the load of impact on your heel, the Saucony Cohesion 10 is an appreciable choice for running shoes.
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GRID, Injection Molded EVA
The impact on heel strike while running needs to be as low as possible to achieve maximum comfort levels. In this, the Saucony Cohesion 10 running shoes perform well as they harness EVA midsole technology. Also, these running shoes have a nice bounce feel to them; enabling an easier stride.

Mesh Upper
These running shoes have respectable breathability. In addition to the EVA midsole shock absorbent technology, the design in the mesh upper brings even more comfort while you run. Finally, these shoes are created to help give flexibility.

Cost and Value
The cost range for this pair of running shoes is size-dependent. Starting out a low purchase price, the cost increases to the mid-upper range. Because of the deployed technologies and high-quality design, however, these best shock absorbing running shoes are well-worth the buy.
Pros
  • GRID, Injection-molded EVA Midsole
  • Breathable, Mesh Upper
  • Flexible
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Broad cost range is size-dependent.

4. Reebok ZigWild TR 2-M

4. Reebok ZigWild TR 2-M
This pair of running shoes consists of a PU (polyurethane) sockliner for orthotic support and ZigTech midsole for cushioning and shock absorption. Next, StableFit technology ensures a secure fit via molded memory foam. Not only are these best shock absorbing running shoes perfect for comfort and breathability through the upper mesh design, but the lugs allow for great traction when heading off-road into tricky terrain.
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ZigTech
The ZigTech midsole introduces cushioning and shock absorption. Additionally, it works hard to help lessen the impact of heel strikes while running; thereby, lessening any jarring load from the rest of your body. Lastly, this shock absorber system is well-designed with the athlete in mind.

StableFit
To begin with, StableFit technology is molded memory foam at the heel. It maintains foot security by creating a better fit; thus, less chance for injury from slippage inside of the shoes. Finally, the foam is able to take pressure off of your heel when you strike the ground while running.

Cost and Value
The cost of these running shoes is size-dependent. The pricing, however, remains budget-friendly in that the shoes provide breathability, shock absorption, and support for orthotics. In fact, these shoes are well-priced given the high state of quality offered.
Pros
  • ZigTech Technology
  • StableFit Technology
  • SmoothFit Seaming
  • Mesh Upper
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Broad cost range; size-dependent

5. New Balance 1080v7

5. New Balance 1080v7
Shock absorbent technology is present within the foam midsole. Additionally, phase impact of heel strike handles well via the foam construction. Next, the mesh upper design helps feet to breathe which allows comfortability while running. In conclusion, these high-quality running shoes perform well during your workout and provide excellent stability and great fit.
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Foam Midsole
The foam midsole is the central focus of support for these running shoes. Subsequently, the foam handles heel strike impact very well and provides decent spring when returning to mid-stance. Overall, these shoes provide great shock absorption and perform as expected.

Mesh Upper
The mesh upper design in these best shock absorbing running shoes allows for good breathability. Furthermore, when combined with the foam midsole construction, these shoes allow the runner to focus more time on the run and less time thinking about the gear; that is, comfortability and shock absorption is the forte of this design.

Cost and Value
These running shoes are not budget-friendly, as they jump into the upper range in cost fairly quickly. But when considering the overall quality and design, these shoes could easily be worth the investment to any runner.
Pros
  • Foam Midsole
  • Lessens Impact
  • Removable Insole
  • Mesh Upper
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Not very budget-friendly

6. Nike Tanjun Premium

6. Nike Tanjun Premium
To start with, these running shoes from Nike are made with a foam midsole to provide both shock absorbency and comfort. Next, this pair of shoes redefines minimalism, as the midsole is sturdy enough to double as an outsole. When it's all said and done, the name of these shoes lives up to their meaning, Tanjun (the Japanese word for simplicity).
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Foam Midsole
First and foremost, the foam midsole in these shoes takes streamlining and simplicity to the next level. Next, the midsole doubles as an outsole to help absorb heel strikes when running. At the end of the day, this design serves to reduce impact while keeping your feet softly cushioned.

Waffle-inspired Traction
The waffle-inspired outsole pattern on this pair of running shoes is not deep. These shoes are not built to withstand rough terrain but are an ideal running shoe for a surface such as concrete or asphalt.

Cost and Value
These best shock absorbing running shoes have an extreme size-dependent and color-dependent cost associated with them. Starting at a relatively average cost, they quickly rise into the higher price range with various choices between color and size. As such, these shoes are not very budget-friendly.
Pros
  • Shock absorbent Technology
  • Foam Midsole Doubles as an Outsole
  • Waffle-inspired Outsole Pattern
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Not very budget-friendly

7. ASICS Gel-Contend 4

7. ASICS Gel-Contend 4
The ASICS Gel-Contend 4 is impressive. These shoes deploy a mix of technologies to help maintain a great run. Firstly, the shock absorption system is made of gel® midsole. Secondly, your feet are able to remain dryer through the ConforDry moisture-wicking sockliner. Moreover, the sockliner is removable to provide orthotic support. In conclusion, these shoes have a wonderful design and are constructed well.
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GEL Cushioning System
First off, this pair of best shock absorbing running shoes utilizes a gel® midsole to provide excellent shock absorbency. Additionally, this technology helps to return to mid-stance after your heel strikes against the surface. At the end of the day, this system is great for handling the impact your feet produce while running.

Removable Sockliner
The ComforDry sockliner is moisture-wicking. This helps to keep your feet dryer throughout your workout. In addition, the sockliner is removable and can be replaced with orthotic support. This makes these running shoes quite impressive, indeed.

Cost and Value
As with many shoes on the market, the cost of these runners is size-dependent. Starting out a budget-friendly price, they quickly rise to the mid-to-upper range in cost. With all of the technologies implemented, however, these shoes do not seem to be overly priced.
Pros
  • GEL Cushioning System
  • ComforDry Removable Sockliner
  • Reduces Force and Impact
  • Smooth Transition to Mid-stance
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Broad cost range; size-dependent

8. ASICS Gel-Excite 4

8. ASICS Gel-Excite 4
For those of you who are looking for a shoe for moderate mileage running, the Asics Gel Excite 4 is the go-to choice. Having a forefoot and rearfoot Gel cushioning system in place, these are shoes which handle impact and give you a nice transition back to midstance. Furthermore, if you are in need of a medical orthotic, these shoes have a sockliner which is removable.
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Removable Sockliner
When an orthotic is needed, this pair of shoes helps to accommodate, as they come equipped with a removable sockliner. This aids in people's needs to extend the value of this shoe's worth.

AHAR Outsole
The Asics high-abrasion rubber outsole is designed with strategic points of interests in mind; that is, these outsoles are created to bring you the best in durability and grip.

Cost and Value
This pair of shoes is priced to be budget-friendly when compared to other shoes on this list. Furthermore, they are great for those running moderate mileages and have decent-quality build about them. As such, they are worth every penny spent.
Pros
  • AHAR Outsole
  • Removable Sockliner
  • Rearfoot Gel Cushioning
  • Forefoot Gel Cushioning
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • For Moderate Running
  • Size runs small

9. Brooks Ghost 10

9. Brooks Ghost 10
These best shock absorbing running shoes from Brooks have a full-length segmented crash pad to help lessen the phase impact of heel strike. Next, Omega Flex Grooves are implemented to give mobility during shock absorption and movement; thereby, allowing for easier transition to mid-stance. With eight colors available to choose from, you are certainly in the running to look good in these road-ready shoes.
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Full-length Segmented Crash Pad
The crash pad system is designed to handle most any foot landing and sets up for easier transition upon heel strike. As such, returning to mid-stance becomes much easier while running your favorite road course.

Omega Flex Grooves
Omega Flex Grooves is a technology which allows for great stability, fluidity, and forefoot movement. After considering this and the full-length segmented crash pad working together as one, you can be more confident in your gear; thus, you will be able to enjoy your run that much more.

Cost and Value
These running shoes are size-dependent in cost and the range falls in the middle region. With the superiority in quality, however, the purchase price seems more than reasonable. In fact, these shoes could be a great addition to a runner's arsenal.
Pros
  • Medium-to-high Arch Support
  • Omega Flex Grooves
  • Full-length Segmented Crash Pad
  • Mesh Upper
  • Traditional Lace-up Closure
Cons
  • Cost is in mid-range
  • Support is for neutral runners

10. ASICS FuzeX

10. ASICS FuzeX
This pair of running shoes deploys multi-technologies to ensure you are running at your best. Firstly, the fuzeGEL midsole provides shock absorbency using gel® technology. Secondly, ComforDry sockliner technology is removable and allows you a dryer, more breathable environment. Lastly, seamless technology helps to provide a frictionless encounter while running. With all of these technologies combined, the runner reaps the benefits of enjoying the run without worrying over the gear.
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fuzeGEL Midsole
This pair of best shock absorbing shoes from ASICS utilize a gel® system. Next, the heel strike load reduces through the gel® midsole which helps to provide a comfortable running experience. Furthermore, the gel® shifts to the front which allows your feet to 'spring' back into action.

ComforDry
ConforDry technology allows for a dryer, more breathable environment inside of the shoes. Moreover, the accompanying ComforDry sockliner is removable and has moisture-wicking properties. This pair of shoes is truly designed to help absorb heel strike impact, as well as helping to give the runner a comfortable experience.

Cost and Value
Size-dependency in cost is associated with this pair of best shock absorbing running shoes. Even with the potentially wide range jump in pricing, the high-quality makeup of these running shoes makes them an excellent choice for an investment. At the end of the day, these shoes are made for runners and perform well.
Pros
  • fuzeGEL Midsole
  • ComforDry Sockliner
  • Seamless Construction
  • AHAR Outsole
  • Multi-color Variety
Cons
  • Broad cost range; size-dependent

As previously mentioned, the best shock absorbing running shoes usually utilize and implement a shock-absorbent technology within the midsole. With this being stated, there are multiple variations of various technologies used by different companies. Additionally, the best shock absorbing running shoes, generally, take into account the shoe as a whole when designing their function; that is, the upper, last, inner sole, midsole, and outsole are all working parts which act as one unit. In other words, a great shock-absorbent technology needs all of the other available parts to function and play well together. When this occurs, shock-absorbing technology is able to perform at its optimal peak performance.

Furthermore, when shock-absorbing technology is performing at its optimal maximum, you will reap the benefits of being able to enjoy your run without the hassles and frustrations of worrying over gear. Your feet will feel more comfortable, and your body will not ache from jarring loads when heel strikes occur during a run. In a nutshell, the best shock absorbing running shoes work hard to lessen the load of jarring forces associated with heel strikes. Generally speaking, these types of shoes will make the transition to mid-stance much easier than attempting the same run inside of a pair of shoes having no midsole at all. In conclusion, a pair of running shoes with shock-absorbent technology is only as great, as the sum of the working parts combined into one.

 

Criteria used to Evaluate the Best Shock Absorbing  & Impact Protection Running Shoes

According to a research article published in the Journal of Biomechanics, people who run barefoot (De Wit, B; De Clercq, D; Aerts, P. 2000) have shown a significant increase in impact pressure. More specifically, these impacts included higher load rates (speed by which you apply force to your body) and vertical impact forces (knees, hips, etc.).  In other words, it is a bad idea to run long-term wearing no shoes at all. But what about shock absorbency in shoes? Can shock-absorbent technology improve health?

Shock absorbency in running shoes must serve two central purposes. First, the technology needs to lessen the point of impact by reducing vertical impact forces. Generally speaking, runners strike the heel first and this is where most of the pressure lands the hardest while running. Secondly, shock-absorbency needs to support the foot-in-motion. Do the running shoes have the ability to help return your foot to mid-stance in a fluid motion, as to allow a continuance to the ball of your foot? Shock-absorbent technology should contain a fluid-like property which allows the foot to continue its natural motion from heel strike to the forefoot.

Finally, we need to consider the three types of runners, according to their natural foot motion. Known as pronation, this term defines the motion of the foot in relation to the subtalar joint (below the ankle).

Pronation

After your feet land on the ground (while walking or running), they will have a natural and inward rolling-motion associated with them (pronation). Pronation is responsible for the reduction of impact after initial landing and stabilization when changing terrain types. Sound familiar? This is exactly what the best shock absorbing running shoes do in performance. They reduce the initial shock of landing, help to stabilize, and are shaped in such a way as to support your natural pronation-type.

  • Neutral Pronation
    Neutral pronation is best described when your foot lands on the outside lateral heel. As you continue through your motion, the foot will roll inward and you lift your foot with most of your weight at the ball of your foot. This type of runner is known as a neutral runner, or pronator.
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  • Underpronation
    Underpronation (supination) is exactly how it sounds and the foot does not pronate appreciably. A foot which underpronates will strike at the outside lateral heel and lift off with most of the weight at the little toe. As you might have guessed, this type of runner is known as an underpronator.
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  • Overpronation
    Overpronation occurs during excessive inward rolling. In general, the heel strike is inner and continues throughout the motion. Instead of weight lifting off from the ball of the foot, the inner-side of the ball will receive the most pressure. As such, this type of runner is known as an overpronator.

Now, the reason you need to be aware of these different types of pronation is that running shoes cater to each of these characteristics. For example, an overpronator is more likely to receive an injury while wearing running shoes designed for neutral runners. This is because the shoes are not supporting the feet in an optimal fashion and running can place a lot of stress on your feet. In addition, the shoes will feel uncomfortable and will not fit correctly. This will make your run feel like work and a lot less like an enjoyable activity. Moreover, your body may ache more than it should in relation to your run. Running should be about fun and exercise; not about injury and pain.

The Eyeball Test

First and foremost, always seek out a healthcare professional when matters of health arise. There are specialists which can help determine (via testing) your exact pronation pattern. As such, you will be better equipped when choosing your next pair of best shock absorbing running shoes. With that being stated, however, there is a quick way you can get a closer approximation to your pronation type; the eyeball test.

Retrieve a pair of older running shoes and look at the outsole. Firstly, neutral runners will have an S-shaped pattern associated with wear. In addition, the ‘S’ will begin at the outside lateral heel and will end at the great toe area (the ball of the foot). Secondly, underpronators will have wear located on the outside lateral from the heel to little toe. Finally, overpronators will show most wear on the inside of the heel and the inner-side of the ball of the foot (great toe).

*Remember, the eyeball test is only to help give you an idea of your running type and is by no means a replacement for a healthcare professional. Furthermore, any medical-related comments are for informational purposes only.

The Gait Cycle

The Gait Cycle is another method by which shock-absorbency can be measured. At its most simplistic explanation, the Gait Cycle begins when one foot makes its initial contact with the ground; toe’s off and then touches the ground again. Nearly, 80% of runners make initial contact using a heel strike. Furthermore, most of the remaining runners land center-foot. Top speed is achieved through sprinting and most sprinters land closer to the forefoot. So, where does this all come into play when evaluating the best shock absorbing running shoes?

Unless you are a sprinter, you are more than likely a runner who makes contact via a heel strike. Moreover, your body’s vertical impact forces are in direct correlation to the support (pronation) your heel can attenuate upon initial impact and through to mid-stance. If you are running barefoot (heel-to-toe), your heel must cushion your body weight in a passive fashion while in continual motion. Furthermore, the loading rate is quick and spikes heavily as your enter mid-stance; the location at which your foot is now supporting your bodyweight.

Remember, loading rate is the speed at which impact forces maximize within your joints (ankles, knees, and hip), per se. If you run heel-to-toe, then the obvious choice is to add extra cushioning to your heel area. After all, minimizing load rate means better health and longer-lasting joint integrity. Extra padding in the heel area, however, is not enough. As previously stated, initial contact for a heel-to-toe runner occurs at the heel strike but is passive in nature. Your full body weight is not supported by your foot; until, it reaches mid-stance. As such, the best shock absorbing running shoes need to support both heel strike (passive impact) and a return to mid-stance (active impact).

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q. What are the different types of running shoes?
A. There are four general variations of classes for running shoes. Each class serves its own purpose and is directed toward a specific function. These variations are cushion, lightweight, motion control, and stability.

  • CushionCushion running shoes are made of the softest midsole, provide excellent flexibility, and retain the least amount of medial support. Light-to-midweight underpronators having high arches are best suited for this class. The shock-absorbent technology is usually based on silicone gel pads and encapsulated or compression molded EVA.
  • LightweightThese running shoes serve to gain speed. In the quest to gain speed, cushioning and support is minimalized. As such, they should only be used for racing and/or fast-paced training.
  • Motion ControlThese running shoes centralize their focus on heavier overpronators having low-to-flat arches. They provide maximum medial support. The shock-absorbent technology is usually found in the form of a polyurethane (PU) midsole.
  • Stability – These running shoes have an overall best mix of medial support, flexibility,  durability, and cushioning. Midweight neutral runners having low-to-medium arches are best suited for this class.

Q. What is an EVA midsole?
A. EVA is an acronym which stands for ethylene-vinyl acetate. EVA is a lightweight polymer. When referring to running shoes, EVA is produced as a foam and classes as a cushioning system.

Q. What is a PU midsole?
A. PU (polyurethane) is an organic polymer. It is heavier in density than EVA, but more durable. When referring to running shoes, PU classes as a cushioning system.

Q. What is a gel midsole?
A. A gel midsole is made from silicone and classes as a cushioning system when referring to running shoes.

Q. What is motion control when referring to arches?
A. Motion control refers to a shoe’s ability to control mobility; or at the very least, the ability to set up the follow through motion associated with a foot landing. There are three types of pronation-types. Likewise, there are three descriptions associated with motion control systems, per se.

  • High Arch: Motion Control System (lack, thereof) – Those with high arches are sometimes predisposed to being an underpronator. Avoidance of stability and/or motion control running shoes is recommended, as these shoes will further decrease mobility when mobility is most needed.
  • Flat Arch: Motion-Control SystemThose with flat arches are sometimes predisposed to being an overpronator. Stability and/or motion control running shoes is recommended, as these shoes will provide more support when support is most needed.
  • Normal Arch: Motion-Control System – Those with normal arches can wear cushioning or stabilizing shoes. Cushioning is great if no abnormalities in pronation are present. Otherwise, if there is a mild-to-moderate abnormality, a stabilizing motion control system is recommended.

Q. How do I fit my shock absorbing running shoes properly and still make the purchase online?
A. You can easily make an online purchase after you visit a specialist store and fit your running shoes which you are planning to buy later. This will help you to be certain of the shoes you are interested in purchasing. For those who do not have the means to visit a specialist store, another alternative is to read the reviews. People can be loud and clear when running shoes do not fit true to size. Feel free to post up questions on those websites which allow it. Reviewers can be very helpful.

  • Firstly, you should be aware of your pronator-type (i.e. neutral, underpronator, or overpronator). In addition to using the ‘eyeball test’ previously mentioned, you should seek out a healthcare professional. In doing so, you will be certain of your pronation.
  • Secondly, your shoes should be fitted in the evening and/or your feet measured, as this is the time when your feet will be their largest. Additionally, a half-inch needs to be between the end of the toe box and your longest toe.
  • Thirdly, if you are able to visit a specialist store before your online purchase, wear your running socks and bring any orthotic you need to place inside. In this, you will be able to gain the best fit.
  • Finally, always remember if the running shoes are not comfortable, they are not the right shoes for you.

Q. When should I replace my running shoes?
A. To begin with, the recommended mileage of running shoe replacement varies according to the weight of the person, the demand of resulting impact when striking the ground, pronation, type of surface you are running on, and environmental variables such as cool mornings versus hot days. With this being stated, there is a range you can keep an eye out for. The generalized mileage recommendation is between 350-600 miles. Furthermore, you should rotate your running shoes to help the midsoles last longer instead of wearing them consecutively. One such reason is allowing time for dampness to naturally dry from sweat.

Q. Can I run in the rain?
A. Generally speaking, it is recommended you don’t run in the rain, as a wet midsole is 40% – 50% less effective in shock-absorbency.

Q. What is the proper care for my running shoes?
A. As previously mentioned, it is a better idea to rotate between two pairs of running shoes versus wearing them in consecutive order. This gives time for the shoes to recover naturally; and yes, they need to do this. Your shock-absorbing midsoles will last much longer. In addition to rotating between running shoes, there are other things to consider when properly caring for your gear.

  • First, always take the time to untie your shoes after a run. Exhaustion makes it easy to just kick them off but this habit will destroy the heel counter and will lower your running shoe’s stability and effectiveness.
  • Secondly, washing running shoes in a machine-wash will deform their shape. It is highly recommended you do not do this.
  • Next, allow your damp shoes to dry naturally (air dry). Running shoe components can degrade when temperatures become too high, such as in a machine dryer.
  • Finally, always wear your running shoes only for your running activity.

Sources

  1. n.a., Shock absorbing midsole for an athletic shoe, Article, Oct 01, 2002
  2. De Wit, B.; De Clercq, D.; Aerts, P., Biomechanical analysis of the stance phase during barefoot and shod running., Article; Research, Mar 01, 2000
  3. Schmidt, J., Biomechanics! What is Loading Rate?, Article, Oct 04, 2016
  4. Brückner, K; Odenwalda, S; Schwanitza, S; Heidenfelder, J; Milani, T., Polyurethane-foam midsoles in running shoes - impact energy and damping, Article; Research, Jun 01, 2010
  5. Logan, S; Hunter I; Hopkins, J.T. J; Feland, J; Parcell, A., Ground Reaction Force Differences Between Running Shoes, Racing Flats, and Distance Spikes in Runners., Article; Research, Mar 01, 2010
  6. American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society®; Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation, How to Select the Right Athletic Shoes, Article,
  7. MAJ Asplund, C. M.D; MAJ Brown, D. M.D., The Running Shoe Prescription, Article, Jan 01, 2005
  8. Cook SD; Kester MA; Brunet ME., Shock absorption characteristics of running shoes., Article; Research, Jul 01, 1985
  9. Novacheck, T., The biomechanics of running, Article; Research; PDF, Aug 25, 1997


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